Oriental Therapy clinic

Master Michael Forster

Michael Forster developed an interest in Oriental Medicine after many years of martial arts training. In 1978-79 he studied shiatsu (acupressure) and sports medicine and in 1980 began medical training in England at The College of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture in Leamington Spa.

Graduating in 1983, he returned to Prince George, opened an acupuncture practice and resumed teaching martial arts.

Since graduating, Master Forster has continued with post graduate studies, including tutorials in Los Angeles and Victoria with his professor, J.R.Worsley and a course in Classical Japanese Acupuncture, Meridian Therapy in Hawaii with Shudo Denmai.

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Master Michael Forster
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History of Acupuncture

Acupuncture developed in China approximately 5000 years ago. Over the centuries it made its way through Asia, Korea, Japan, the Phillippines, Viet Nam etc. As it evolved within each culture it took on the characteristics of the indigineous people.

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Principals of Acupuncture

The Chinese classics dictate that if chi is in perfect balance within the body then disease cannot exist. Only when the chi is imbalanced can a person become ill.

Although all traditional acupuncture endeavours to balance the chi or internal energy, the principles of technique differ in each culture.

Diagnostic and needling techniques vary, as does the way in which the consultation with the patient is undertaken. All symptoms are taken into consideration but the main focus of the diagnosis is to determine the underlying causative factor involved in the disharmony. A patient may have twenty symptoms but there will be only one causative factor.

Once the cause of the disease is determined, treatment may proceed. Tiny acupuncture needles are inserted into meridans or pathways of chi energy to stimulate or sedate, to remove stagnation in blood, dispel cold, increase warmth or circulation, or to remove blocks of any kind within the system. Pain in the body can be an indication that there is a block or stagnation in the body's energy. Sometimes moxibustion is used, which involves warming the skin with the herb artemesia vulgaris to assist the chi flow. This is especially beneficial in cold diseases, such as certain types of rheumatism, or where the energy is chronically deficient.

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Meridians
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Meridians

There are fourteen major meridians of chi energy. Twelve are associated with body organs and two, (the governing and conception meridians), are central, on the spine and on the abdomen, supporting the chi in the organ meridians.

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Pulse Diagnosis

Each of the organs has its own pulse. This energy pulse flows superficially to the radial artery, bi-laterally, and is paramount in both diagnosis and treatment. The quality of chi within the pulse is evaluated. Each pulse has twenty six qualities which help to determine whether there is excess or deficient chi, stagnation, dampness, cold etc. Treatment protocol is based on the pulse diagnosis.

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Meridians
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Yin and Yang

Yin and yang are opposing polarities that exist in all things. They are an expression of balance and harmony both in the universe and in all living things. One cannot exist without the other and as one peaks in excess it will ultimately become deficient. As dawn breaks yang energy rises and as day turns into night, yin dominates. This energy is reflected in the body, as all organs have yin and yang within them. For example, there is kidney yin and kidney yang, each presenting with different symptoms, even though the kidney is a yin organ. The paired yang organ of the kidney is the bladder.

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Meridians
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Treatment

Once treatment commences, changes in all symptoms are monitored. The causative factor may not be the first thing to change, rather the patient may see change in other areas, or have a general sense of well being. Treatments are usually weekly until symptoms abate and are then spread out until they become maintainance only, when a patient would have treatment several times a year.

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Five Element Acupuncture

The universe is made up of elements and this is reflected in the Chinese classics of elemental association.

Fire, earth, metal, water and wood represent the universal elements and have both a creative and controlling nature. Wood creates fire, fire creates earth, earth creates metal, metal creates water, and water creates wood. For example, water nourishes trees and wood burns to create fire. This is called the shen cycle.

The parallel is seen within the body as the energy of one organ flows into the next. The kidneys support the liver, the liver supports the heart, the heart supports the spleen, the spleen supports the lungs, and the lungs support the kidneys.

This is also known as the law of mother-son. Water is the mother of wood and the son of metal and therefore, using this theory, if a problem were to exist in the liver the kidneys may be treated to support the system.

There is also a controlling cycle. This is known as the ko cycle. If chi becomes excess in a meridian or organ system it may be sedated within the excess organ,or controlled by supporting the opposing element. For example if the fire element (heart), were excess and out of control, water (kidneys),  may be tonified to reduce the fire. We can see this in nature where a fire may be out of control and is subdued or extinguished by water.

This explanation simplifies a rather complex system of supporting and controlling energy.

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Meridians
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Cancellation Policy

Due to high volume and recent problems with missed and broken appointments, we require 24 hours notice for any cancellation. All cancellations without 24 hours notice and all broken appointments will be billed at the regular hourly rate.

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Oriental Therapy Clinic Contact Information

Treatments are by appointment only. Our mailing address is:

215-1717 Third  Avenue
Spruce Capital Building
Prince George, BC
Canada V2L 3G7

Phone: 250-563-5551

View a Google map of the clinic's location

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Links

Visit the Korean Hapkido Institute web site at www.khihapkido.com.

For further research on Acupuncture, please visit the the following links:

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